CYCLE TESTING FOR 6th GRADE

Cycle 1

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Click on each of the standards below to view the related tutorial. 

SC.8.P.8.5 - Recognize that there are a finite number of elements and that their atoms combine in a multitude of ways to produce compounds that make up all of the living and nonliving things that we encounter.

SC.8.P.8.6 - Recognize that elements are grouped in the periodic table according to similarities of their properties.

SC.912.P.8.5 - Relate properties of atoms and their position in the periodic table to the arrangement of their electrons.

SC.8.P.8.7 - Explore the scientific theory of atoms (also known as atomic theory) by recognizing that atoms are the smallest unit of an element and are composed of sub-atomic particles (electrons surrounding a nucleus containing protons and neutrons).

SC.912.P.8.4 - Explore the scientific theory of atoms (also known as atomic theory) by describing the structure of atoms in terms of protons, neutrons and electrons, and differentiate among these particles in terms of their mass, electrical charges and locations within the atom.

SC.6.L.14.1 - Describe and identify patterns in the hierarchical organization of organisms from atoms to molecules and cells to tissues to organs to organ systems to organisms

SC.6.L.14.2 - Investigate and explain the components of the scientific theory of cells (cell theory): all organisms are composed of cells (single-celled or multicellular), all cells come from pre-existing cells, and cells are the basic unit of life.

SC.6.L.14.3 - Recognize and explore how cells of all organisms undergo similar processes to maintain homeostasis, including extracting energy from food, getting rid of waste, and reproducing.

SC.6.L.14.4 - Compare and contrast the structure and function of major organelles of plant and animal cells, including cell wall, cell membrane, nucleus, cytoplasm, chloroplasts, mitochondria, and vacuoles.

SC.912.L.14.2 - Relate structure to function for the components of plant and animal cells. Explain the role of cell membranes as a highly selective barrier (passive and active transport).

SC.912.L.14.3 - Compare and contrast the general structures of plant and animal cells. Compare and contrast the general structures of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.

SC.6.N.1.1 - Define a problem from the sixth grade curriculum, use appropriate reference materials to support scientific understanding, plan and carry out scientific investigation of various types, such as systematic observations or experiments, identify variables, collect and organize data, interpret data in charts, tables, and graphics, analyze information, make predictions, and defend conclusions.

December 2018 Exam only covers Cycle 2

Cycle 2

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CLICK HERE to find out what specific you will need to know per each benchmark.

Click on each of the standards below to view the related tutorial. 

SC.6.L.14.5: Identify and investigate the general functions of the major systems of the human body (digestive, respiratory, circulatory, reproductive, excretory, immune, nervous, and musculoskeletal) and describe ways these systems interact with each other to maintain homeostasis.

SC.6.L.14.6: Compare and contrast types of infectious agents that may infect the human body, including viruses, bacteria, fungi, and parasites.

SC.6.L.15.1: Analyze and describe how and why organisms are classified according to shared characteristics with emphasis on the Linnaean system combined with the concept of Domains.

SC.912.L.15.6: Discuss distinguishing characteristics of the domains and kingdoms of living organisms.

SC.8.P.8.1: Explore the scientific theory of atoms (also known as atomic theory) by using models to explain the motion of particles in solids, liquids, and gases.

SC.912.P.8.1: Differentiate among the four states of matter.

SC.8.P.8.4: Classify and compare substances on the basis of characteristic physical properties that can be demonstrated or measured; for example, density, thermal or electrical conductivity, solubility, magnetic properties, melting and boiling points, and know that these properties are independent of the amount of the sample.

SC.8.P.8.3: Explore and describe the densities of various materials through measurement of their masses and volumes.

SC.8.P.8.5: Recognize that there are a finite number of elements and that their atoms combine in a multitude of ways to produce compounds that make up all of the living and nonliving things that we encounter.

SC.8.P.8.6: Recognize that elements are grouped in the periodic table according to similarities of their properties.

SC.8.P.8.7: Explore the scientific theory of atoms (also known as atomic theory) by recognizing that atoms are the smallest unit of an element and are composed of sub-atomic particles (electrons surrounding a nucleus containing protons and neutrons).

SC.6.L.14.1: Describe and identify patterns in the hierarchical organization of organisms from atoms to molecules and cells to tissues to organs to organ systems to organisms.

SC.6.L.14.2: Investigate and explain the components of the scientific theory of cells (cell theory): all organisms are composed of cells (single-celled or multi-cellular), all cells come from pre-existing cells, and cells are the basic unit of life.

SC.6.L.14.3: Recognize and explore how cells of all organisms undergo similar processes to maintain homeostasis, including extracting energy from food, getting rid of waste, and reproducing.

SC.6.L.14.4: Compare and contrast the structure and function of major organelles of plant and animal cells, including cell wall, cell membrane, nucleus, cytoplasm, chloroplasts, mitochondria, and vacuoles.

SC.6.N.1.1: Define a problem from the sixth grade curriculum, use appropriate reference materials to support scientific understanding, plan and carry out scientific investigation of various types, such as systematic observations or experiments, identify variables, collect and organize data, interpret data in charts, tables, and graphics, analyze information, make predictions, and defend conclusions.

Cycle 3

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Click on each of the standards below to view the related tutorial. 

SC.8.P.8.8 - Identify basic examples of and compare and classify the properties of compounds, including acids, bases, and salts.

SC.8.P.8.9 - Distinguish among mixtures (including solutions) and pure substances.

SC.912.P.8.11: Relate acidity and basicity to hydronium and hydroxyl ion concentration and pH

SC.912.P.8.7: Interpret formula representations of molecules and compounds in terms of composition and structure.

SC.6.P.13.1 - Investigate and describe types of forces including contact forces and forces acting at a distance, such as electrical, magnetic, and gravitational.

SC.6.P.13.2 - Explore the Law of Gravity by recognizing that every object exerts gravitational force on every other object and that the force depends on how much mass the objects have and how far apart they are.

SC.8.P.8.2 - Differentiate between weight and mass recognizing that weight is the amount of gravitational pull on an object and is distinct from, though proportional to, mass.

SC.6.P.13.3 - Investigate and describe that an unbalanced force acting on an object changes its speed, or direction of motion, or both.

SC.6.P.12.1 - Measure and graph distance versus time for an object moving at a constant speed. Interpret this relationship

SC.6.E.7.4 - Differentiate and show interactions among the geosphere, hydrosphere, cryosphere, atmosphere, and biosphere.

SC.912.E.7.3: Differentiate and describe the various interactions among Earth systems, including: atmosphere, hydrosphere, cryosphere, geosphere, and biosphere.

SC.6.E.7.9 - Describe how the composition and structure of the atmosphere protects life and insulates the planet.

Cycle 4

CLICK HERE to view the test contents and the number of questions per benchmark.

CLICK HERE to find out what specific you will need to know per each benchmark.

Click on each of the standards below to view the related tutorial. 

SC.8.P.8.9: Distinguish among mixtures (including solutions) and pure substances.

SC.8.P.8.8: Identify basic examples of and compare and classify the properties of compounds, including acids, bases, and salts

SC.8.P.8.2: Differentiate between weight and mass recognizing that weight is the amount of gravitational pull on an object and is distinct from, though proportional to, mass.

SC.6.P.13.1: Investigate and describe types of forces including contact forces and forces acting at a distance, such as electrical, magnetic, and gravitational.

SC.6.P.13.2: Explore the Law of Gravity by recognizing that every object exerts gravitational force on every other object and that the force depends on how much mass the objects have and how far apart they are.

SC.6.P.12.1: Measure and graph distance versus time for an object moving at a constant speed. Interpret this relationship

SC.6.P.13.3: Investigate and describe that an unbalanced force acting on an object changes its speed, or direction of motion, or both.

SC.6.E.7.4: Differentiate and show interactions among the geosphere, hydrosphere, cryosphere, atmosphere, and biosphere

SC.6.E.7.9: Describe how the composition and structure of the atmosphere protects life and insulates the planet

SC.6.E.7.5: Explain how energy provided by the sun influences global patterns of atmospheric movement and the temperature differences between air, water, and land.

SC.6.E.7.1: Differentiate among radiation, conduction, and convection, the three mechanisms by which heat is transferred through Earth's system.

SC.6.E.7.2: Investigate and apply how the cycling of water between the atmosphere and hydrosphere has an effect on weather patterns and climate.

SC.6.E.7.3: Describe how global patterns such as the jet stream and ocean currents influence local weather in measurable terms such as temperature, air pressure, wind direction and speed, and humidity and precipitation.

SC.912.E.7.5: Predict future weather conditions based on present observations and conceptual models and recognize limitations and uncertainties of such predictions

SC.912.E.7.6: Relate the formation of severe weather to the various physical factors

SC.6.E.7.6: Differentiate between weather and climate.

SC.912.E.7.5: Predict future weather conditions based on present observations and conceptual models and recognize limitations and uncertainties of such predictions.

SC.912.E.7.6: Relate the formation of severe weather to the various physical factors.

SC.6.E.6.1: Describe and give examples of ways in which Earth's surface is built up and torn down by physical and chemical weathering, erosion, and deposition.

SC.6.E.6.2: Recognize that there are a variety of different landforms on Earth's surface such as coastlines, dunes, rivers, mountains, glaciers, deltas, and lakes and relate these landforms as they apply to Florida.

SC.6.N.1.1: Define a problem from the sixth grade curriculum, use appropriate reference materials to support scientific understanding, plan and carry out scientific investigation of various types, such as systematic observations or experiments, identify variables, collect and organize data, interpret data in charts, tables, and graphics, analyze information, make predictions, and defend conclusions.

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